Archiv für März 2015


UX is not UI

17. März 2015 - 18:11 Uhr

I found this article interesting and explicative about what UI and UX are.

Here is a short part of „the UX Umbrella“ that I found interesting:

„In a presentation that Dan Willis (@uxcrank) did for the DC Startup Weekend in 2011, he had a phenomenal image that really shows what UX encompasses:

ux-umbrella

The items that are sheltered by the umbrella have two purposeful omissions – user experience design and interface design.

User experience design is omitted because it is the loose term that encompasses all of the various disciplines. You’re never really doing any “user experience design” that isn’t just a combination of one or more of the things under the umbrella.

User interface design is omitted because it is the crossover between visual design (look and feel) and the interaction design (how the look and feel work). Combine those two and you have an interface. The interface is the result of the “solution design” that came before it.

A skillful interface designer understands the importance of providing the user with a solution to a defined problem.“

Posted by 

 

 

 

Kommentieren » | Interface Design

Twisted Memories in Virtual Reality

16. März 2015 - 17:53 Uhr

Recently, I had a weird moment in VR which I am excited to share with you.

After playing around with Oculus Rift DK2 and screening different VR-Apps, a Quake 1 porting directly caught my attention. Quake 1, the ego-shooter from 1996, developed by id Software. As one of the first 3D games with polygon based models it was one of the big milestones in 3D game experience development in the middle of the 90s. I am sure the 30+ of you definitely know it.

 oculus_twisted_memories

Source 1: http://www.theriftarcade.com/quake-1-updated-with-dk2-support/
Source 2: http://www.theriftarcade.com/quake-1-review-for-oculus-rift/
Source 3: https://github.com/jeremiah-sypult/Quakespasm-Rift/releases

I remembered the hours I spent in front of my old CRT 17″ inch monitor that was flickering with 75Hz into my eyes. At that time it was just amazing. So I was really looking forward to experience Quake with the Oculus Rift. The first steps in virtual space immediately created a gameplay that was even more visceral than 20 years ago.

But there was also something else I observed. Suddenly I had this short, but very intense moment where past and future somehow fused into the present. Sounds strange and indeed it is. But in retrospective you often are kind of the observer, watching yourself sometimes from a 3rd person perspective. So in this weird moment I saw myself in the past sitting in front of my PC, viewing through this window frame like monitor, playing Quake and now I was just in the same game – in real immersive 3D. It was a totally new experience close to a Déjà-vu, but different. Somehow I was twisting around my own memories.

 

So why am I writing this?

Because this simple example showed me once again how much more intense and immersive the experience with VR is compared to the established technologies that let us consume digital content today. VR, accompanied by an increased field of view, 3D, head tracking and motion tracking creates something that nowadays is often called Sense of Presence. And I totally agree. Or as Chelsea Stark writes on Mashable „As VR simulations become more immersive than ever, these emotional moments will feel more and more like the human perception of memories“ (–> article on Mashable)

The invention of the Internet sent society into something that German magazines love to call „Gleichzeitigkeit“. VR-technologies now even have the power to somehow bridge past and present by providing the possibility of recalling memories virtually.

But not only virtual reality, of course also the augmentation of reality with digital visuals, abbreviated as AR, will be one of the key technologies of the future. Within the next 5 to 10 years VR and AR together might push the next dimension, the dimension of space, to another level of perception. Imagine you will be able to be present physically everywhere and anytime in an unlimited nonphysical world.

How would that change your everyday life?

 

Blast from the past

I have to admit that VR fascinates me since cyberspace and cyberpunk culture got big back in the 80s – Bladerunner, Lawnmower Man, Neuromancer, Strange Days, Total Recall and Tron – just to mention a few classics of sci-fi movies and literature. (–> see also our related blog post from 2010)

Today, the technology is mature and cheap enough to start the next big thing. All big companies are in, developing their unique systems and we are curious to see the differences, constraints, possibilities, pros and cons of Sony Project Morpheus, HTC Vive VR, Samsung Gear VR, Oculus Rift, Magic Leap, Google Glass and Microsoft HoloLens and many more. Also established as well as new social, video and gaming networks are preparing themselves, like e.g. facebook that acquired Oculus one year ago, or vyuu from Belgium aiming to be the „Youtube“ in VR or SteamVR by Valve.

As designers we are asked to embrace these new chances for new meaningful fields of applications, avoiding a dystopia as sketched in 80s and 90s science fiction.

Imagine for example realistic virtual training scenarios for doctors or firefighters. Imagine new ways to experience scientific experiments or teaching materials at school. Imagine an immersive design process with virtual prototyping. Imagine sharing emotions and memories with your family and friends …

The opportunities in the virtual world are almost unlimited. And we are excited to get our hands on.

 

To sum it up

I am convinced that these new realities will not only entertain us, but will have a huge impact on how we think, learn, educate, work, communicate, get inspired, relax, travel, reflect on ourselves and others in the future.

Let’s shape the future of VR and AR together! Get in touch with us. We would love to hear your thoughts.

P.S.:

For all you skeptics out there that now grumble „I got sick in VR…“ I just want to take up the following phrase I just read from AMD’s Liquid-VR-SDK: „…if your CPU and GPU can’t keep up you throw up…“ ^^

„Twisted memories in VR“ is definitely a story we might research further. So stay tuned for new experiments.

 

Further inspiration

http://www.themachinetobeanother.org/
http://mashable.com/2014/06/26/virtual-reality-memory/

 

Related recommendations

http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/534971/magic-leap/
http://www.vice.com/video/love-industries-digital-sex-669
http://www.zdf.de/ZDFmediathek/beitrag/video/2257218/Anschnallen%2521-Jaron-Lanier-im-Interview#/beitrag/video/2257218/Anschnallen!-Jaron-Lanier-im-Interview

Kommentieren » | Art, DA KNOWS, Interface Design

This one wearable I would wear (for medical monitoring)

16. März 2015 - 11:10 Uhr

Do you remember the poster designaffairs made for the mcbw?

cc4eee04-25c5-4442-be9a-9a48a6da228b-original

Here’s a product concept made by two US professors which is very close to our design concept and seems to be very useful. I would immediately wear it for medical analytic issues or health care monitoring:

Kommentieren » | Allgemeines

Modular Interfaces for musicians: 2 ways to upgrade your iPad

6. März 2015 - 12:07 Uhr

Multi-touch devices like the iPad have become more and more popular over the last couple of years. Nowadays they are not only used for browsing and sending e-mails, but also as a medium for new fields of applications. One particular thing of multi-touch devices is in need of improvement: It is the lack of haptic feedback, which makes it difficult to set parameters precisely.

Modulares Interface by Florian Born

These controllers expand the usage of a touch device with a haptic feedback while adjusting parameters.
By using magnets, the different controllers can easily be arranged onto the iPad. A modular interface appears, which uses a given device just like the iPad.

The system contains three different parts:
– The physical controllers (button, slider and knob), made out of conductive aluminium to pass on the electrical discharge of the human skin.

– A frame, made out of aluminium and plastic, in which the iPad is inserted. The edge of the frame has embedded magnets, making it possible to position the controller precisely and easily.

– The software, running as an app on the iPad. It organizes the control elements and sends the parameters to the corresponding software, which is controlled by the modular interface.
The controllers are made of aluminium because of its property to forward electrical charge. Therefore, the electrical discharge of the human skin can be transmitted to the touchscreen of the iPad.
To prevent the control devices from screeching the display, a piece of conductive foam is used on the end of each controller.
An app programmed in Cinder/C++ is running on the iPad. It manages the individual setup of the controllers and reads their input on the touchscreen. The app then transfers the information via OSC to a connected application.

Tuna Knobs, Physical control knobs for your touchscreen by Tunadjgear

A Stylus in the shape of knob, with a small axis in the middle and a suction cup on the bottom. Made to control (music) apps with virtual knobs on every touchscreen device.

So Tuna Knobs stick to your touchscreen using a micro suction cup and translate a turning movement to a touch command. Simply stick them on your screen and you are ready to start twiddling away. The Knobs use conductive rubber to translate turning a knobs into the right signal for your touchscreen, not dissimilar to how a stylus works. Tuna Knobs are produced by Tuna DJ Gear, funded by Kickstarter and can be bought online.

Kommentieren » | Interface Design

Microsoft’s ideas for interaction design in 5 to 10 years

4. März 2015 - 09:17 Uhr

Misrosoft thought about future interaction ideas in productive environment and shows these in a very impressive video:

Kommentieren » | Allgemeines

Adobe and Microsoft take a look in the crystal ball

2. März 2015 - 18:04 Uhr

some of these interactions show very interesting approaches, especially the multi-device things and the „natural“ usages

Kommentieren » | Interface Design, Trend Report